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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Bressay Transmitter



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 30th 17, 05:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
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Default Bressay Transmitter


I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local transmitter,
Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought this was usually
reserved for low power relay stations.

  #2  
Old May 30th 17, 06:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Default Bressay Transmitter

Could be because of interference from somewhere.
Brian

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"Tweed" wrote in message
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I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local transmitter,
Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought this was usually
reserved for low power relay stations.



  #3  
Old May 30th 17, 07:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
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Posts: 15
Default Bressay Transmitter

Brian Gaff wrote:
Could be because of interference from somewhere.
Brian


Maybe, but there is not a lot else up here. Just bean reading how Bressay
was originally fed by a 7 GHz link from Fair Isle, which in turn picked up
its signal from Orkney. I'm assuming it all comes via an undersea fibre
optic cable these days. Internet is certainly very good, and you see FTTC
green cabinets in all sorts of out of the way places across the islands.

  #4  
Old May 30th 17, 07:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 538
Default Bressay Transmitter

In article ,
Tweed wrote:

I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local transmitter,
Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought this was usually
reserved for low power relay stations.


Across sea paths VP is less prone to fading. Biggest example is Rosneath.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #5  
Old May 30th 17, 08:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
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Posts: 293
Default Bressay Transmitter

On 30/05/2017 20:29, charles wrote:
In article ,
Tweed wrote:

I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local transmitter,
Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought this was usually
reserved for low power relay stations.


Across sea paths VP is less prone to fading. Biggest example is Rosneath.



Also, it may may well be to protect against distant (but mostly over-sea
path) HP co channel interference from Durris (nr Aberdeen)
and quite possibly something in Norway ?

Also Bressay was only a 10kW station, (same as relays such as Guildford
and Reigate) In 'new DTT money' it's 2kW


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #6  
Old May 30th 17, 08:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,719
Default Bressay Transmitter

On 30/05/2017 21:20, Mark Carver wrote:
On 30/05/2017 20:29, charles wrote:
In article ,
Tweed wrote:

I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local transmitter,
Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought this was usually
reserved for low power relay stations.


Across sea paths VP is less prone to fading. Biggest example is Rosneath.



Also, it may may well be to protect against distant (but mostly over-sea
path) HP co channel interference from Durris (nr Aberdeen)
and quite possibly something in Norway ?

Also Bressay was only a 10kW station, (same as relays such as Guildford
and Reigate) In 'new DTT money' it's 2kW


It's all of a muddle though really, isn't it? There's no easy way to
differentiate between 'main' and 'relay' stations other possibly than
some arcane fact about the distribution of signals from one site to the
next, and there is no clear rule that decides the polarity of any
transmission site. Every possible rule has exceptions that invalidate it.

It's the same with FM radio. It used to be possible for tuner
manufacturers to gang the presets with 2.2MHz spacing, so tuning one
station tuned all three, but of course that was a long time ago in a
very different world.

And 'A' roads. You used to be able to work out which road fitted where
by its number.

And reg plates.

Bill

Bill
  #7  
Old May 31st 17, 07:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 538
Default Bressay Transmitter

In article ,
wrote:
On Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:01 +0100, Mark Carver
wrote:


On 30/05/2017 20:29, charles wrote:
In article ,
Tweed wrote:

I'm currently in Lerwick. I'm curious as to why the local
transmitter, Bressay, appears to be vertically polarised. I thought
this was usually reserved for low power relay stations.

Across sea paths VP is less prone to fading. Biggest example is
Rosneath.



Also, it may may well be to protect against distant (but mostly over-sea
path) HP co channel interference from Durris (nr Aberdeen)
and quite possibly something in Norway ?

Also Bressay was only a 10kW station, (same as relays such as Guildford
and Reigate) In 'new DTT money' it's 2kW


Are there many like Rowridge which are both?
We are on the fringe of the coverage area up near where Hants ,Wilts
and Dorset borders and a lot of properties suffered from the Televes
as big as the chimney disease when Digital was first introduced, since
the VP signal became available the main local installer appears to
favour a much more discreet log periodic design.


few. Rosneath has a HP aerial on the back to feed Garelochead and Uig, on
Skye, has an HP feed to Cletraval (North Uist).

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #9  
Old May 31st 17, 01:19 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,430
Default Bressay Transmitter

On Tue, 30 May 2017 21:31:10 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

there is no clear rule that decides the polarity of any transmission site.


It's still "polarisation" not "polarity", even in the new fangled DTT world.
  #10  
Old June 1st 17, 06:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Posts: 180
Default Bressay Transmitter

On Tuesday, 30 May 2017 21:31:12 UTC+1, wrote:
And 'A' roads. You used to be able to work out which road fitted where
by its number.
And reg plates.


And telephone numbers.

You knew where you were when you dropped the initial 20 from the number in the next town and prefixed it with 9 7741 that it was going to be a local call and you'd only need one twopence.

Now you have to dial the full STD code for somewhere in the same town in some places, but dial 150 and you end up talking to someone who learned English from 1980s videos of EastEnders.

Owain

 




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