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battery tools are crap



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 13th 17, 02:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,011
Default battery tools are crap

It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I
don't do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a
revelation they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a
replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw
would have been £120. A new mains powered saw was £110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you
don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for the
charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You
pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the
bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains
equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat
battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking
about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used
an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new
toy is.

Bill

  #2  
Old September 13th 17, 02:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,214
Default battery tools are crap

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I don't
do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a revelation
they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a
replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw would
have been £120. A new mains powered saw was £110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you
don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for the
charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You pay
more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the bigger
battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains
equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat
battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know. Ignorance
of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking about it, I
bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used an electric
drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new toy is.


Generally I agree with you, The only advantage that battery tools (lawn
mower, hedge trimmer, electric drill) have is that there is no power cable
to get tangled up around your feet, ladders, trees etc. But that is about
the only advantage. My grandpa bought a cylinder mower (ie like the old
Suffolk Punch petrol mowers) which ran off a 12V car battery. He had to cut
his lawn (which wasn't *very* big) on two days, because the battery charge
wouldn't last for the whole lawn, and charging the mower from the mains took
about 6 hours. When I once used it, it was struggling after about 10 minutes
despite being on charge overnight, so I discreetly found a can of 3-in-1 and
oiled every bearing I could find. "That battery seems to be holding its
charge much better now" was his comment a few days later. I kept very quiet!
A mains-powered or petrol mower would probably not get lubricated as much
because the motor is powerful enough to overcome a bit of friction without
running slow or using excessive battery charge,

  #3  
Old September 13th 17, 03:14 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 618
Default battery tools are crap

In article , NY
wrote:
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I
don't do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a
revelation they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a
replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw
would have been 120. A new mains powered saw was 110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you
don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for
the charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You
pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the
bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the
mains equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat
battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess.
Thinking about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have
never used an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited
their new toy is.


Generally I agree with you, The only advantage that battery tools (lawn
mower, hedge trimmer, electric drill) have is that there is no power
cable to get tangled up around your feet, ladders, trees etc. But that
is about the only advantage.


sometimes you're doing things where there is no mains power. I worked on
quite a few open air thetare shows. We had a gennie for the lighting and
sound, but it wasn't going to get turned on so that a few of us could use
power tools during the get-in - and sometimes it hadn't arrived on site
anyway.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #4  
Old September 13th 17, 04:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
PeterC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 789
Default battery tools are crap

On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:30:34 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking
about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used
an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new
toy is.

Bill


Some tools aren't that good unless v. expensive, but I've been using 18V,
12V and lately, 10.8V combis or drill/drivers for about 8 years now. They're
Makita and Bosch Pro and the Bosch 18V combi is better than the 700W Bosch
mains that's 20 years old, a lot lighter, smaller, faster and easier to
handle.
About 7 years ago I drilled 50-off 8mm holes about 40mm deep in my
neighbour's wall (for vine eyes; into rustic bricks) with an 18V Makita
combi. It took ~1.25 batteries' worth, I didn't have to wrangle a flex and I
could be closer, so using the vac to catch the dust was easy - look mum, no
hands!
There's a Henry vac. with 2-off 36V LiIon batteries that looks goosd - 300
though!
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #5  
Old September 13th 17, 05:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,011
Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 14:40, NY wrote:

I discreetly found a can of 3-in-1 and oiled every bearing I could find.
"That battery seems to be holding its charge much better now" was his
comment a few days later.


It's very noticeable with disability scooters how lubrication and
adjustment improves battery charge life. (As does hard surfaces [not
carpets] and non-bumpy surfaces [not cobbles])

Bill
  #6  
Old September 13th 17, 05:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,011
Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 15:14, charles wrote:

sometimes you're doing things where there is no mains power. I worked on
quite a few open air thetare shows. We had a gennie for the lighting and
sound, but it wasn't going to get turned on so that a few of us could use
power tools during the get-in - and sometimes it hadn't arrived on site
anyway.


Yes of course. I'm lucky because both vans have big inverters and I also
have a 2kW generator.

Bill
  #7  
Old September 13th 17, 06:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,011
Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 18:00, Huge wrote:
On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 14:30:34 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.


That'll be because you don't know **** all.


Oh I knew a Polish chargehand who used to say, "You tink I know ****
nottin! I tell you I know **** all!"

Bill
  #8  
Old September 14th 17, 07:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Michael Chare[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 14:30, Bill Wright wrote:

Well I wanted to use my mains powered angle grinder at the end of my
drive to cut some blocks as part of moving the gateposts because my new
car is much wider than the previous version (same brand, model name).

So I needed to buy the flex for an extension lead. Previous I have used
rubber covered leads for this. Now there are plastic covered ones which
although cheaper are a bit less flexible.

--
Michael Chare
  #9  
Old September 15th 17, 02:14 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 534
Default battery tools are crap

On Thursday, 14 September 2017 19:13:04 UTC+1, Michael Chare wrote:
On 13/09/2017 14:30, Bill Wright wrote:

Well I wanted to use my mains powered angle grinder at the end of my
drive to cut some blocks as part of moving the gateposts because my new
car is much wider than the previous version (same brand, model name).

So I needed to buy the flex for an extension lead. Previous I have used
rubber covered leads for this. Now there are plastic covered ones which
although cheaper are a bit less flexible.


And don't crack up if left in the sun like rubber ones do.


--
Michael Chare


  #10  
Old September 15th 17, 03:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
bilou[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default battery tools are crap


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I don't
do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a revelation
they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a
replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw would
have been 120. A new mains powered saw was 110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you
don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for the
charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You pay
more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the bigger
battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains
equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat
battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know. Ignorance
of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking about it, I
bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used an electric
drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new toy is.

Bill

Hi
I totally agree with you but you forgot some problems:
Most tools are not usuable when charging ,like a PC.
Batteries loose charge very quickly and cannot be shared.
My 50m cable for the lawnmover can be and is shared with
a lot of tools and appliances :-)
Some times AC tools are over powered or too big
For a drill the only alternative is a Dremel that is too small.
For a screwdriver there is no alternative.




 




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