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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

MSF radio clocks.



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 29th 17, 10:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 160
Default MSF radio clocks.

The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.

Retuned the PVR - now have all the channels where they should be.

  #2  
Old October 30th 17, 06:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,159
Default MSF radio clocks.

On Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:03:10 -0000, "Ian Field"
wrote:

The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.


My only MSF clock behaved perfectly too, but the rest of my various
timepieces are a bit of a mixed bag.

The Aldi weather station, presumably DCF, still shows an hour ahead,
so maybe DST has to be switched manually. I'll deal with that one
later when I can find the instructiuons.

The TV receivers all picked up the right time, but the Roberts
internet radio didn't. If it hasn't been used for a while, it'll
correct a small discrepancy when first switched on, so clearly it's
capable of checking the time (from an ntp server?) but has to be told
manually whether DST is active or not.

The mobile phone picked up the right time, but the clock in the
landline phone is completely manual, just like an ordinary clock
that's just a clock and nothing but a clock.

My spare phone, not a smartphone, just an old fashioned dumbphone with
a physical keypad and a green screen, has a setting for automatic time
setting, but it seems to ignore it, so I have to set it manually.

The clock in the car can only be set forwards, so needed 23 presses of
the button for the hours, and a couple more for the minutes. My guess
is that these may be deliberately designed to run a little slow to
make minor corrections easier, because I normally have to advance the
minutes several times during the 6 months between DST changes.

The mains driven digital alarm clock (bought in 1982 and still working
perfectly) only needed the hours changing. As long as power is not
interrupted the minutes are always exact.

My main computer, booted first into Linux Mint, picked up the right
time, then when rebooted into Windows went back another hour. To fix
this I go into settings and switch "Set time automatically" to off,
and then on again, so it looks as though Windows doesn't check the
time very often, certainly not on bootup, and needs to be reminded.

Then there's a Sony digital camera that has wi-fi but needs its clock
setting manually, and apparently can only manage 12 hour AM/PM.

There's bound to be something I've forgotten, but I expect I'll round
them all up eventually. Give me about 6 months...

Rod.
  #3  
Old October 30th 17, 06:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
PeterC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 789
Default MSF radio clocks.

On Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:03:10 -0000, Ian Field wrote:

The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.

Retuned the PVR - now have all the channels where they should be.


One MSF clock worked OK on the signal but every so often went wrong by,
usually, a small amount. With a clock showing a credible but wron time it's
easy to miss a bus.
I cut through the aerial wire, don't bother to change it for DST, put it
where the temperature reading was usefaul and it needs correcting every
couple of years.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #4  
Old October 30th 17, 08:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 338
Default MSF radio clocks.

On 30/10/2017 06:45, Roderick Stewart wrote:

The mobile phone picked up the right time, but the clock in the
landline phone is completely manual, just like an ordinary clock
that's just a clock and nothing but a clock.


Many landline phone clocks only update the time when they receive a
call, because the data is carried in the 'Caller Display' packets.

I ring myself up, to update the clocks on our landline devices


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #5  
Old October 30th 17, 08:29 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,226
Default MSF radio clocks.

On 30/10/2017 06:45, Roderick Stewart wrote:

My main computer, booted first into Linux Mint, picked up the right
time, then when rebooted into Windows went back another hour. To fix
this I go into settings and switch "Set time automatically" to off,
and then on again, so it looks as though Windows doesn't check the
time very often, certainly not on bootup, and needs to be reminded.


I have a spare PC that normally runs Linux but has the option of booting
into XP. When I checked things on Sunday morning it was 3 minutes slow,
so it looks as though this system which I never turn off doesn't
routinely check the internet time but does know the dates to change the
hour.

I closed down Linux and booted XP and it was an hour slow, so I looked
at the time setting perameters and it showed it should have checked with
the internet time server but there was a communications fault. I
clicked the "Try Again" option and it again failed to correct the time,
and it told me the next automatic check would be a week in the future.
So it looks like XP at least (but probably other versions of Windows
too, though Win7 just states that it happens automatically without
explaining how) checks the time weekly on a Sunday. I reset the XP
clock manually, then booted back into Linux which then showed the right
time rather than 3 minutes out. So it looks as though that version of
Linux checks the time on boot.

Jim
  #6  
Old October 30th 17, 08:29 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 949
Default MSF radio clocks.

On 30/10/2017 06:45, Roderick Stewart wrote:

Then there's a Sony digital camera that has wi-fi but needs its clock
setting manually, and apparently can only manage 12 hour AM/PM.

There's bound to be something I've forgotten, but I expect I'll round
them all up eventually. Give me about 6 months...


You'll have to work faster! The clocks change in 5 months time and you
want to be ready for that.


  #7  
Old October 30th 17, 09:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,901
Default MSF radio clocks.

I see True Christmas is back again.
I have never heard of most of the stuff on that channel.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Ian Field" wrote in message
...
The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.

Retuned the PVR - now have all the channels where they should be.



  #8  
Old October 30th 17, 09:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,901
Default MSF radio clocks.

For me the non speaking ones are the biggest pain, ie the ones with hands
under plastic.
Rest are OK except one which perversely, can speak the time but not the
numbers when you are setting it, it siinply dings instead.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:03:10 -0000, "Ian Field"
wrote:

The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.


My only MSF clock behaved perfectly too, but the rest of my various
timepieces are a bit of a mixed bag.

The Aldi weather station, presumably DCF, still shows an hour ahead,
so maybe DST has to be switched manually. I'll deal with that one
later when I can find the instructiuons.

The TV receivers all picked up the right time, but the Roberts
internet radio didn't. If it hasn't been used for a while, it'll
correct a small discrepancy when first switched on, so clearly it's
capable of checking the time (from an ntp server?) but has to be told
manually whether DST is active or not.

The mobile phone picked up the right time, but the clock in the
landline phone is completely manual, just like an ordinary clock
that's just a clock and nothing but a clock.

My spare phone, not a smartphone, just an old fashioned dumbphone with
a physical keypad and a green screen, has a setting for automatic time
setting, but it seems to ignore it, so I have to set it manually.

The clock in the car can only be set forwards, so needed 23 presses of
the button for the hours, and a couple more for the minutes. My guess
is that these may be deliberately designed to run a little slow to
make minor corrections easier, because I normally have to advance the
minutes several times during the 6 months between DST changes.

The mains driven digital alarm clock (bought in 1982 and still working
perfectly) only needed the hours changing. As long as power is not
interrupted the minutes are always exact.

My main computer, booted first into Linux Mint, picked up the right
time, then when rebooted into Windows went back another hour. To fix
this I go into settings and switch "Set time automatically" to off,
and then on again, so it looks as though Windows doesn't check the
time very often, certainly not on bootup, and needs to be reminded.

Then there's a Sony digital camera that has wi-fi but needs its clock
setting manually, and apparently can only manage 12 hour AM/PM.

There's bound to be something I've forgotten, but I expect I'll round
them all up eventually. Give me about 6 months...

Rod.



  #9  
Old October 30th 17, 09:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
PeeGee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 156
Default MSF radio clocks.

On 30/10/17 06:57, PeterC wrote:
On Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:03:10 -0000, Ian Field wrote:

The least reliable MSF clock did what it was supposed to when the clocks
went back - so reception conditions must be good ATM.

Retuned the PVR - now have all the channels where they should be.


One MSF clock worked OK on the signal but every so often went wrong by,
usually, a small amount. With a clock showing a credible but wron time it's
easy to miss a bus.
I cut through the aerial wire, don't bother to change it for DST, put it
where the temperature reading was usefaul and it needs correcting every
couple of years.


I only seem to have a problem during "maintenance", when the clock will
show times like 8:77AM (at 9:17AM) or even symbols,
where 7: followed by 2 symbols can represent times after 8:39

--
PeeGee

"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
  #10  
Old October 30th 17, 11:00 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bob L
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default MSF radio clocks.

On Mon, 30 Oct 2017 06:45:01 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:03:10 -0000, "Ian Field"
wrote:



The Aldi weather station, presumably DCF, still shows an hour ahead,
so maybe DST has to be switched manually. I'll deal with that one
later when I can find the instructiuons.

My Aldi DCF changed the time OK, however as it is DCF it works best if
it is orientated EASTish/WESTish, so that the internal aerial is not
end on to the transmitter.

MSF Northish/Southish

Both dependent where you are in the UK of course.
 




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